Current and Future Challenges for U.S. Manufacturing

53. China's Industrial Emissions Are Greater Than Other Top Countries Combined

Since 1998, China’s industrial emissions have grown 96 percent. Over the same period, the rest of the BRIC countries saw notable increases, with 36 percent in Brazil, 69 percent in Russia, and 80 percent in India. Meanwhile, the U.S. industrial sector experienced a slight decrease of 5 percent. This disparity presents both a threat and an opportunity for U.S. companies. The BRICs’ emissions could perhaps continue unchecked, inflicting global damage to our collective air, water, and other natural resources. There is an opportunity, however, for U.S. companies to use technological innovations to help all countries reduce their individual emission levels.

To Competitiveness

38

According to the UN, U.S. Manufacturing Slipped to #2

39

According to the World Bank, U.S and Chinese Manufacturing Are Comparable

40

Manufacturing's Share Within Countries Declines

41

Manufacturing Exports Alone Are Not Enough to Sustain U.S. Economic Growth

42

The U.S. Is the #1 Destination for Foreign Direct Investment

43

The U.S. Ranks High But Is Not the Easiest Country To Do Business In

44

Inflation-Adjusted Manufacturing Has Kept Up With the Overall Economy

45

Measuring the Quantity of Manufacturing GDP Is Distorted by High-Tech

46

Traditional Manufacturing Has Not Kept Up With Overall Economic Growth

47

The U.S. Has a Structural Cost Disadvantage

48

Among 9 Largest Trading Partners, Only France Has Higher Structural Costs Than the U.S

49

The U.S. Does Not Keep Pace With Falling Corporate Tax Rates

50

U.S. Healthcare Costs Are Skyrocketing

51

Commercial Tort Costs on Decline But Still Too High

52

Despite Rhetoric, Regulations Are as Burdensome as Ever

53

China's Industrial Emissions Are Greater Than Other Top Countries Combined